Michigan Drunk Driving Laws 

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When you drink alcohol or use other drugs and drive, you endanger your life as well as the lives of your passengers and other motorists. Each year, thousands of people are killed or permanently disabled because someone drove under the influence of alcohol or other chemical substances. Michigan takes a strong stand against drivers who abuse substances and drive.


Michigan's Implied Consent Law     -     GO TO TOP

If arrested for drunk driving in Michigan, you will be required to take a chemical test to determine your bodily alcohol content (BAC). Under Michigan's Implied Consent Law, all drivers are considered to have given their consent to this test. If you refuse a test, six points will be added to your driver record and your license will be suspended for six months. Please be aware that suspension of a  license is automatic for any refusal to submit to the test. This is a separate consequence from any subsequent convictions resulting from the traffic stop. If you are arrested a second time in seven years and again unreasonably refuse the test, six points will be added to your driver record and your license will be suspended for one year. If you refuse to take the test under the Implied Consent Law or if the test shows your BAC is 0.10 or more, your driver license will be destroyed by the officer, and you will be issued a 625 g paper permit to drive until your case is resolved in court.

The Implied Consent suspension may be appealed to the Driver License Appeal Division. The request for hearing (available below) must be mailed within 14 days of the date of arrest or your operator's or chauffeur's license and vehicle group designation or operating privilege will be automatically suspended. You are not required to have an attorney at this hearing, but an attorney may represent you if you wish.


Drinking and Driving is Illegal     -     GO TO TOP

Drink and drive, and the results can be deadly. Several hundred people die every year in Michigan from alcohol-related crashes. The courts, law enforcement, state and local governments, as well as a number of private agencies, are working together to reduce and prevent the thousands of injuries and deaths that result from drunk driving in Michigan.

 

Under Michigan law, it is illegal to drive:

  • When under the influence of, or impaired by, alcohol, illegal drugs, and certain prescribed medications.
  • With a bodily alcohol content of 0.10 or more (driving while under the influence).
  • With a bodily alcohol content of more than 0.07, but less than 0.10 (driving while impaired).

 

If you are under age 21 it is against the law:

  • To drive with a bodily alcohol content of 0.02 or greater, or have any presence of alcohol other than that consumed at a generally recognized religious ceremony.
  • To buy, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. You may transport alcohol in a vehicle only when accompanied by an adult age 21 or older. If you are caught with alcohol in your vehicle and there is no adult accompanying you, you can be charged with a misdemeanor, whether you're on the road or in a parking lot.

 

It is best to never drink and drive. If you plan on drinking, select a designated driver ahead of time who is not going to drink. You can also ask someone else to give you a ride, call a taxi, use public transportation, or seek other assistance. If someone you know has been drinking or using drugs, do not let him or her drive.  Find a designated driver, call a taxi, or insist that the person use public transportation. Never ride with anyone who has been drinking or using drugs. If necessary, take away a person's car keys and offer him or her a place to sleep. Be sure drivers are completely sober before they get behind the wheel.

 

Effects of Alcohol


Driving requires concentration, motor skills, common sense, and a concern for the safety of everyone on the road. Alcohol affects people differently. Mixing drugs or medications with alcohol can be especially dangerous and even deadly, especially behind the wheel.

The effects of alcohol are the same whether you drink beer, wine, or whiskey. A12-ounce can of beer, 5-ounce glass of wine, and a 1.5-ounce shot of whiskey all contain the same amount of alcohol. Drink a standard serving of any of these and the effects will be the same to your body. Your judgment and self-control will be affected. Drinking even one drink can impair your ability to drive, slow your reaction time, dull your concentration, and cause visual problems. Many people mistakenly believe that coffee, a cold shower, exercise, or fresh air can sober them up. The only thing that sobers you up is time.

 

Illegal or Street Drugs and Medications

 

Because everyone's metabolism is different, it's difficult to predict how medications and drugs will affect the body. Drugs and medications can be as dangerous as alcohol when mixed with driving.  Illegal or "street" drugs are sold without a prescription and are particularly dangerous because users do not always know the contents, purity, or possible effects of these drugs. Prescription and non-prescription medications may also contain substances that can adversely affect your ability to drive safely. Some drugs such as antihistamines, which are found in many cold remedies and allergy preparations, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and pain relievers may cause drowsiness. Diet pills, "stay awake" drugs, and other medications with stimulants such as caffeine, ephedrine, and pseudoephedrine may cause excitability or drowsiness. Effects may also vary depending on the combination of drugs. Know the contents and potential side effects of any drugs you are taking and be sure it is safe to drive when using them. For more information, consult your physician or pharmacist.

 

Recognizing Drivers Who Have Been Drinking or Using Other Drugs

 

It is possible to recognize drivers who may have been drinking or using other drugs. They may:

  • Weave within their lane.
  • Wander from one lane to another.
  • Run off the pavement.
  • Stop too quickly or slowly.
  • Drive too quickly or slowly.
  • Go through stop signs or other signals.
  • Drive on the wrong side of the road.

 

These signs do not always mean that the driver has been drinking or using drugs, but they do require your full attention. If you observe a dangerous situation, do not become personally involved. Get an accurate description of the vehicle and license plate number. Call 911, the local Michigan State Police post, or a telephone operator for police help. You are most likely to encounter other drivers who have been drinking or using drugs at night or early morning, particularly from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m.; on the weekends, especially late Friday and Saturday nights; on holidays; or near bars and other businesses that sell alcohol.

 

When you see a suspected drunk driver, put as much distance as possible between yourself and the suspected drunk driver. Think twice about passing a suspected drunk driver. Let the driver pass you, especially when approaching rapidly. Avoid their uncertain actions. Stay alert. It is possible that the same driver may be met further down the road.

 

Anti-Drunk Driving Laws


Anti-drunk driving laws require swift and sure action and stiff penalties for drunk drivers.  The laws:

  • Require courts to decide drunken driving cases within 77 days after an arrest.
  • Require a mandatory six-month driver license suspension even for a first conviction. A driver may be eligible for a restricted license after serving 30 days of the suspension.
  • Require five days to one year of consecutive jail time and/or 30 to 90 days of community service for a second conviction of drunk driving.
  • Include a felony for a conviction for drunk driving that causes death.
  • Include a felony for a conviction for drunk driving that causes a serious injury to another.
  • Require fines for a conviction of driving while a driver license is suspended or revoked of up to $500 for a first offense, and $1,000 for an additional offense.
  • Do not allow hardship appeals for habitual alcohol offenders.
  • Require a reinstatement fee of $125 if your driver license was suspended, revoked, or restricted. This fee is separate from the reinstatement fee needed for any other driving violations.

 

Preliminary Breath Test

 

When stopped by a law enforcement officer for suspicion of driving while intoxicated, you may be asked to take sobriety tests including a Preliminary Breath Test (PBT) at the roadside to determine whether you are under the influence of alcohol. If you refuse to take the PBT, you will be charged with a civil infraction and fined up to $100 plus court costs. Persons under age 21 who refuse to take the PBT will receive two points on their driver record. Even if you take the PBT, you must still take the evidentiary chemical test (blood, breath, or urine test).

 

Michigan's Implied Consent Law


If arrested, you will be required to take a chemical test to determine your bodily alcohol content (BAC). Under Michigan's Implied Consent Law, all drivers are considered to have given their consent to this test. If you refuse a test, six points will be added to your driver record and your license will be suspended for six months.  Please be aware that suspension of a license is automatic for any refusal to submit to the test.  This is a separate consequence from any subsequent convictions resulting from the traffic stop.  If you are arrested a second time in seven years and again unreasonably refuse the test, six points will be added to your driver record and your license will be suspended for one year. If you refuse to take the test under the Implied Consent Law or if the test shows your BAC is 0.10 or more, your driver license will be destroyed by the officer, and you will be issued a 625 g paper permit to drive until your case is resolved in court.

 

Types of Charges

 

Operating While Impaired (OWI) means that because of alcohol or other drugs in your body, your ability to operate a motor vehicle was visibly impaired.

 

Operating Under the Influence of Liquor (OUIL) means the alcohol in your body substantially affected your driving ability so you could not operate a motor vehicle safely.

 

Operating Under the Influence of Drugs (OUID) means that drugs in your body substantially affected your driving ability so you could not operate a motor vehicle safely.

 

Operating With an Unlawful Bodily Alcohol Content (UBAC) means at the time you were driving, your bodily alcohol content was at or above 0.10. This can be shown by a chemical test.


Under Age 21 Operating With Any Bodily Alcohol Content means having a BAC of 0.02 to 0.07 or any presence of alcohol other than that consumed at a generally recognized religious ceremony.

 

Teen Drivers and Alcohol


Drivers between the ages of 16 and 20 are typically the least experienced drivers on the road. When alcohol is added to their inexperience, the results can be even more deadly. Male teenage drivers with a bodily alcohol content between 0.05 and 0.10 percent are 18 times more likely than a sober, male teen driver to be killed in a single vehicle crash.  Female teenagers are 54 times more likely to be killed than a sober counterpart. Any involvement with alcohol by teens can result in the loss of their license. Simply possessing any alcoholic beverage, whether in a motor vehicle or not, can result in a license suspension for a teen.

 

For information about licensing actions for drivers under age 21, please see the Zero Tolerance section under Driver License Actions below.

 

Anti-Drug Laws


Michigan law requires driver license suspensions for drug convictions, even if you were not driving at the time of the offense. If there are no prior drug violations, your driver license is suspended for six months. No restricted license is allowed for the first 30 days. One or more prior drug convictions in seven years means your driver license will be suspended for one year. No restricted license is allowed for the first 60 days. The driver license reinstatement fee is $125. This fee is separate from the reinstatement fee required for any other driving activity.

 

Driver License Actions

 

First Offense:


OUIL/OUID/UBAC
$100 to $500 fine and one or more of the following:
     Up to 93 days in jail.
     Up to 45 days community service.
Driver license suspension for 30 days, followed by restrictions for 150 days.
Possible vehicle immobilization.
Six points on driver record.

 

OWI
Up to $300 fine and one or more of the following:
     Up to 93 days in jail.
     Up to 45 days community service.
Driver license restriction for 90 days (180 days if impaired by controlled substance).
Possible vehicle immobilization.
Four points on driver record.

 

DWLS
Up to $500 fine, up to 93 days in jail, or both.
Mandatory additional suspension.

 

Any combination, second offense within seven years:


OUIL/OUID/UBAC
$200 to $1,000 fine and one or more of the following:
     Five days to one year in jail.
    30 to 90 days community service.
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum of one year.
License plate confiscated.
Vehicle immobilization 90 to 180 days unless vehicle is forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.
Six points on driver record.

 

OWI
$200 to $1,000 fine and one or more of the following:
     Five days to one year in jail.
    30 to 90 days community service.
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum one year.
License plate confiscation.
Vehicle immobilization 90 to 180 days unless vehicle is forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.
Four points on driver record.

 

DWLS
Up to $1,000 fine, up to one year in jail, or both.
Mandatory additional suspension.
Vehicle may be immobilized for up to 180 days.

 

Any combination, third offense within 10 years (felony):


OUIL/OUID/UBAC
$500 to $5,000 fine and either:
     One to five years imprisonment.
     Probation with 30 days to one year in jail.
60 to 180 days community service.
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum five years.
License plate confiscation.
Vehicle immobilization one to three years unless vehicle is forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.
Registration denial.
Six points on driver record.

 

OWI
$500 to $5,000 fine and either:
     One to five years in prison.
     Probation with 30 days to one year in jail.
60 to 180 days community service.
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum of five years.
License plate confiscation.
Vehicle immobilization one to three years unless forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.
Registration denial.
Four points on driver record.

 

DWLS (third offense-must have two priors within seven years-misdemeanor)
Mandatory additional suspension.
License plate confiscated.
Vehicle immobilized 90 to 180 days.

 

DWLS (fourth offense-must have three priors within seven years-misdemeanor)
Same as for third offense.

 

DWLS (fifth offense-must have four priors within seven years-misdemeanor)
Mandatory additional suspension.
License plate confiscated.
Vehicle immobilized one to three years.

 

First offense
OUIL/OUID/UBAC/OWI/DWLS causing death/serious injury (felony)
     Death-Up to 15 years imprisonment OR $2,500 to $10,000 fine, or both.
     Injury-Up to five years imprisonment OR $1,000 to $5,000 fine, or both.
     Emergency Responder Death-Up to 20 years imprisonment OR $2,500 to $10,000 fine, or both
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum of one year.
License plate confiscation.
Vehicle immobilization up to 180 days unless forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.

 

Second offense (any prior crime within seven years):


OUIL/OUID/UBAC/OWI/DWLS causing death/serious injury (felony)
     Death-Up to 15 years imprisonment OR $2,500 to $10,000 fine, or both.
     Injury-Up to five years imprisonment OR $1,000 to $5,000 fine, or both.
     Emergency Responder Death-Up to 20 years imprisonment OR $2,500 to $10,000 fine, or both.
Driver license denial/revocation for a minimum of five years.
License plate confiscation.
Vehicle immobilization 90 to 180 days unless vehicle is forfeited.
Possible vehicle forfeiture.

 

Open Intoxicants in a Motor Vehicle
Up to a $100 fine.
First offense-no action is taken against driver license.
Second offense-driver license is suspended for 30 days/restricted for 60 days.
Third offense-driver license is suspended for 60 days/restricted for 305 days.
Alcohol screening may be required.
Two points on driver record.

 

Actions for Drivers Under Age 21:

 

Zero Tolerance (under age 21)


First Offense
Up to $250 fine and/or
Up to 45 days community service.
Driver license is restricted for 30 days.
Four points on driver record.

 

Second Offense within seven years:
Up to $500 fine and/or
Up to 60 days community service.
Up to 93 days in jail.
Driver license suspension 90 days.  Any prior drunk driving conviction results in a minimum one-year driver license revocation.
Four points on driver record.

 

Person Under 21 purchase/consume/possess alcohol:


First offense-$100 fine, no action is taken against driver license.
Second offense-$200 fine, driver license is suspended for 30 days/restricted for 60 days.
Third offense-$500 fine, driver license is suspended for 60 days/restricted for 305 days.
Community service may be required.
Alcohol screening may be required.

 

Person Under 21 transport or possess in a motor vehicle:


Up to a $100 fine.
First offense-no action is taken against driver license.
Second offense-driver license is suspended for 30 days/restricted for 60 days.
Third offense-driver license is suspended for 60 days/restricted for 305 days.
Alcohol screening may be required.
Community service may be required.
Two points on driver record.
Vehicle can be impounded up to 30 days.

 

Use Fraudulent ID to Purchase Liquor


Up to a $100 fine, 93 days in jail, or both.
90-day driver license suspension.
Alcohol screening may be required.


Habitual Alcohol Offender     -     GO TO TOP

Prior to October 1, 1999, operators who received two convictions of OUIL/UBAC/OUID within seven years, or any combination of three convictions of OUIL/UBAC/OUID/OWI within ten years, were presumed to be habitual alcohol violators. After October 1, 1999, new legislation makes any combination of alcohol offenses under the Michigan Vehicle Code (the Code) (MCL 257.625) subject to a revocation. The law also provides that a person must be sanctioned under the law in effect at the time of arrest. Therefore, an arrest after October 1, 1999, would trigger application of the new law. At that time, the prior convictions on their record would be used for enhancement.


When licenses are revoked/denied it is for a minimum of one year for a first revocation, and for a minimum of five years for a subsequent revocation within seven years of a prior revocation. After the minimum period of license revocation the operator may apply for a hearing before the Driver License Appeal Division (DLAD) for relicensure. A completed substance abuse evaluation must be submitted before a hearing is scheduled.

A record of this proceeding is made in accordance with Section 322 of the Code for review by the circuit court if the Department’s decision is appealed as provided by Section 323 of the Code. Revocation/denials are not subject to the general 14-day appeal period.


Operators are provided with instructions on how to obtain relicensure several ways: 1) Order of Revocation, 2) three months prior to eligibility for a DLAD hearing they are provided with more detailed instructions including a substance abuse evaluation form that must be completed, 3) these instructions are sent once again, when a request for hearing is received from the petitioner, 4) a tape-recorded message with instructions is also available to ensure that petitioners are prepared for hearings (517-373-1682) and that hearing time is used wisely. Unprepared petitioners should request the hearing be adjourned rather than fail to appear as they are not eligible for another hearing for up
to one year from the date of the scheduled hearing.


The hearing officer shall not order that a license be issued to the petitioner unless the petitioner rebuts the presumption established by Section 303 of the Code by clear and convincing evidence. The burden of proof is on the petitioner.

 

Evidence relevant to rebuttal of the prima facie case includes:

  • That the petitioner's alcohol or substance abuse problems, if any, are under control and likely to remain under control.
  • That the petitioner represents a low or minimal risk of repeating the act of drunk driving or past abusive behavior.
  • That the petitioner has the ability and motivation to drive safely and within the law.

 

The hearing officer shall require that the petitioner prove that he or she has completely abstained from the use of alcohol and controlled substances, except for those controlled substances prescribed by a licensed health care professional, for not less than six consecutive months immediately prior to the hearing, unless the evidence considered at the hearing establishes that a longer period of abstinence, at least a year of sobriety, is necessary. Such evidence requiring a longer period of sobriety includes:

  • A 0.20 or more BAC on a chemical test.
  • Three or more convictions of substance abuse-related offenses.
  • Relapsing after attempting to bring a substance abuse problem under control.
  • Being diagnosed by a professional as alcohol or controlled substance dependent.

 

Evidence such as letters and documentation of sobriety, proof of involvement with a treatment program or support program, an alcohol evaluation, etc., are encouraged to assist the hearing officer in making a decision whether to authorize restricted or full driving privileges. Hearing officers have final decision-making authority in the Department. There is no intra-Departmental appeal, but petitioners may file a Motion for Reconsideration in the event of newly discovered evidence, or a mistake of law or fact.

 

When drivers are approved to return to the road, hearing officers may authorize a restricted license or full privileges. If a restricted license is granted, hearing officers will order a general set of restrictions which include permission to drive to and from residence and place of employment and in the course of employment, to substance abuse treatment program and support group meetings, to regularly scheduled treatment for a serious medical condition, to court probation office and community service and to an educational institution. Operators are required to carry proof of destination and hours with them and to show this to a law enforcement officer, if stopped. Restriction specifics will no longer be carried on the file and will therefore not need updating.


Repeat Offender Laws Require Ignition Interlock     -     GO TO TOP

Repeat Offender Laws

 

Michigan’s Repeat Offender laws are designed to get tough with drivers who repeatedly drive drunk or while on a suspended license. Under the laws, you are a Repeat Offender if you have:

  • Two or more alcohol-related convictions within seven years.
  • Three or more convictions for driving while your license is suspended or revoked in seven years.
  • Three or more alcohol-related convictions within 10 years.


Penalties Under the Repeat Offender Laws


If you are arrested as a repeat offender, the law-enforcement officer will destroy the metal license plate of the vehicle you are driving, whether you own the vehicle or not.  A temporary paper license plate will be issued allowing the vehicle to be legally driven. A new metal license plate cannot be issued until your case is resolved in court.  Sanctions under the Repeat Offender laws include additional driver license suspensions or revocations, metal license plate confiscation, vehicle immobilization or forfeiture, registration denial, the use of ignition interlock devices, and mandatory substance abuse treatment. Repeat Offenders who cause an accident resulting in a long-term injury or death are charged with a felony and face thousands of dollars in fines and years in jail in addition to other penalties.


Registration denial includes any vehicles that are registered, co-registered, leased, or co-leased. During registration denial, it is a crime to attempt to purchase, lease, or obtain a vehicle.   Unless a court order is requested and issued, you may not transfer a vehicle’s registration to any family member if that vehicle is carrying a temporary plate, is immobilized, forfeited, or subject to registration denial. Registration denial continues until you are eligible forrelicensing.


Criminal Sentencing/Administrative Consequences - Alcohol Convictions and Driving While License Suspended

 

Ignition Interlock

 

The Department of State is required to place person on an ignition interlock when they are granted restricted driving privileges from a license revocation as an habitual offender. You cannot drive until after the interlock device has been installed on the vehicle you intend to drive and proof of such installation has been submitted to a local branch office of the Secretary of State. The device must be installed for a minimum of one year.

 

How It Works:

 

An ignition interlock system, referred to as Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) is a breath alcohol analyzer with computer logic and internal memory that interconnects with the ignition and other control systems of a motor vehicle.  The purpose of the BAIID is to measure  the bodily alcohol concentration (BAC) of an intended driver and to prevent the motor vehicle from being started if the BAC exceeds the .025.  The offender can only drive in a vehicle with an ignition interlock device installed.  The device will ask for random retests while driving.  If you acquire three startup test violations within a monitoring period, or one rolling retest failure, or the device detects tampering, the device will require the instrument to be brought in immediately or will lock out the driver from further operation. These test violations will result in further extensions of the one year period.

 

NOTE: If you have ANY questions concerning the ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle, ask your installer. Make sure you understand how this device operates before you leave the installer's premises as you will be responsible for the consequences of the device's operation.    

 

Cost:

 

The state does not regulate the cost of ignition interlock devices.  However, the Legislature did limit the amount that can be charged to people on low-incomes to a maximum of $1 per day.  In order to qualify for this reduced fee your income must fall below 150% of the Poverty Guidelines of the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services.  To determine if you may qualify, see your vendor for details.  The state law does require copies of the previous years filed State Income Tax forms for verification.

 

Final Report:

 

You must drive with an Ignition Interlock installed on your vehicle and a valid drivers license for at least 1 full year.  You may then petition the Drivers License Appeal Division for a hearing.  At that hearing you must present your final report(s) issued by your provider(s) to establish the mandatory minimum length of installations required by law.

 

Location of Service Centers:

 

Providers who wish to install Interlock devices must have a statewide network of service locations which are located within 50 miles (one way) of each driver.  In cases where a driver lives more than 50 miles from a service center, the interlock company may use a mobile unit to travel to a location within 50 miles of a driver. All of the providers listed below have locations throughout Michigan and use mobile units in some of the rural areas of the state.  By calling their toll-free numbers you can find out which service center is most convenient to you.

 

How do I Get an Ignition Interlock Device Installed?

 

Manufacturers and providers who are currently authorized to install ignition interlock devices for Michigan drivers are listed below.  You can contact any of the provider's by calling their toll-free phone number to obtain additional information concerning cost, the location of service centers and to schedule installation.

  • # 1 A AAMERICAN INTERLOCK
    TOLL FREE 1-800-580-0504
    Manufacturer:
    Autosense International
    683 E. Brokau Road
    San Jose, CA  95112 

  • # 1 ACCURATE INTERLOCK OF MICHIGAN
    TOLL FREE:  1-888-234-0198
    Manufacturer:
    SmartStart, Inc.
    4850 Plaza Drive
    Irving, TX  75063

  • A+ ACCELERATED SERVICES, LLC 
    TOLL FREE:  1-866-718-8606
    Manufacturer:
    Guardian Interlock Systems, Inc.
    571-A Haverty Court
    Rockledge, FL  32955

  • NATIONAL INTERLOCK SERVICE
    TOLL FREE:  1-888-294-7002
    Manufacturer:
    Lifesafer Interlock, Inc.
    512 Reading Road
    Cincinnati, OH  45202

  • NEW HORIZON INTERLOCK INC
    TOLL FREE: 1-800-597-5054
    Manufacturer:
    Draeger Interlock, Inc.
    185 Suttle Street
    Suite 105
    Durango, CO  81301

 

Violations of Ignition Interlock:


Violations of the interlock program are divided into "major" and "minor" violations.

 

Minor violations include:

  1. Two months or more after the BAIID is  installed, 3 start-up test failures (BAIID prevented vehicle from starting) occur within a monitoring period.

  2. The petitioner fails to report to the BAIID installer for monitoring. 

 

Major violations include: 

  1. A rolling retest failure (the random retest detects your BAC at 0.04 or more while driving) with no subsequent sample less than 0.04 within 5 minutes.

  2. A §625g permit is issued.

  3. Receives a §625l conviction (crimes for tampering with the device).

  4. Reported tampering or attempts without a conviction. 

  5. Three minor violations within a monitoring period.

  6. BAIID is removed and not installed in another vehicle within 7 days. 

Consequences of a Violation:

 

Minor violations will result in a three month BAIID extension, making persons ineligible for a hearing at the end of the original one-year requirement.  Major violations will result in an immediate reinstatement of the revocation/denial subject to an administrative hearing


source:  Michigan Secretary of State  -  www.michigan.gov/sos/


 

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